• Autoimmune diseases/ Celiac/ Coeliac/ Gluten/ NCGS/ Non Celiac Gluten Sensitivity

    Celiac or NCGS is there a difference?

    Celiac or NCGS

    Celiac or NCGS is there a difference? Celiac (Coeliac in UK and Ireland) disease and the connection with wheat has been known about since the 1940’s and with gluten since 1952. Celiac disease is caused in genetically predisposed people by a reaction to a gluten protein called gliadin which can be found in wheat, barley, rye, spelt, durum, Kamut and triticale with some people also reacting to oats. Celiac Disease can vary from mild to severe usually showing destruction of the gut lining and is an Autoimmune disease.

    Despite nearly 65 years of knowledge it is poorly diagnosed across all age groups and it is estimated that less than a quarter of people are diagnosed. To confirm diagnosis raised antibodies (IgA) and destruction of the villi in the gut lining have to be demonstrated. Certain populations have a higher incidence, the populations of Ireland and Italy appear to and also people with Downs Syndrome have an increased risk .  Celiac disease is associated with a multitude of other chronic medical conditions, many of which are Autoimmune disorders and also some neurological disorders.

    NCGS – Non Celiac Gluten Sensitivity was originally described in the 1980’s and only since 2010 has been included in the spectrum of gluten related disorders. It is also associated with Autoimmune disorders and neurological disorders where no small bowel disease has been discovered.

    It is known that there may be a genetic predisposition but that a trigger such as surgery, infection, pregnancy and emotional stress can trigger symptoms of Celiac disease and NCGS.

    The varied symptoms are common to both and can be:- Read More

  • Adrenal Fatigue/ Cancer./ Energy/ Environmental/ Health/ Hyperthyroidism/ Hypothyroidism/ Mineral Depletion/ Nutrition and Cancer/ Sizzling Minerals

    Interesting Iodine

    iodine deficiency

    Iodine deficiency is a global health concern. The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that over 2 billion people may be iodine deficient with about 50 million of them suffering from deficiency disorders which can range from low energy, cognitive decline, thyroid and adrenal dysfunction to cardiovascular disease, fibrocystic breast disease and a variety of cancers, especially breast and stomach cancer. Research has linked Iodine deficiency with ADHD and Autism with rates rising dramatically over the last two decades. According to research in the USA Iodine levels have dropped by more than half since the 1970’s. Under production of the hormone thyroxine causes weakened neural connections in the brain/nervous system. Iodine is therefore especially necessary for pregnant women and the development of their babies.

    From about the 1920’s onwards many people were suffering the effects of iodine deficiency, sometimes developing a visible swelling at the front of the neck called a Goiter in adults and preventable mental retardation in children due to low levels of iodine in the soil and diet. Governments recognised the problem and decided to add iodine to table salt as a way of increasing iodine levels in the diet. Most salts do not contain enough iodine to rectify the problem and processed foods don’t have to contain iodised salt therefore coupled with the reduction in salt intake over the last 20 years we now have millions suffering deficiency disorders.

    Iodine and the amino acid tyrosine make up thyroid hormones that control metabolism, body temperature, heart rate and glucose and fat levels in the blood. Selenium, Zinc and iron are also co-factors for enzymes that contribute to healthy tissue in the body.

    Too much thyroid hormone results in hyperthyroidism – a high metabolic rate, rapid heart beat and often palpitations, feeling warmer than normal and excessive sweating. In extreme cases it can lead to muscle weakness and weight loss. Too little thyroid hormone results in hypothyroidism – with the opposite symptoms, slow heart rate, feeling cold, constipation, weight gain, dry skin and hair, muscle aches and weakness, depression and fatigue. Energy levels are affected via the thyroid adrenal axis  and so adrenal support is often needed as well as thyroid support.

    It is often confusing that Iodine deficiency can lead to both low thyroid function and hyperthyroidism but fortunately all iodine deficiency disorders and related health issues can be prevented and treated with adequate intake of Iodine. Anyone who has been diagnosed with Hyperthyroidism or Hypothyroidism, Hashimoto’s disease or Graves disease should work with their doctor to assess and correct their Iodine levels.

    These actions, generally promoted as being healthy, can also reduce your available Iodine –

    1. decreasing your salt intake
    2. using salt that has little or no Iodine
    3. being on a vegetarian or vegan diet puts you in an at risk group because plants contain lower iodine than animal and dairy products. It is hard to get even the minimum daily 150 mcg without eating seafood, eggs or dairy but eating small amounts of seaweed would easily correct this imbalance.
    4. sweating profusely while exercising means iodine can be lost in substantial amounts and that also applies to those that work in hot, humid environments.

    How much Iodine do we need? Read More

  • Adrenal Fatigue/ Arthritis/ Autoimmune diseases/ Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/ Nutritional Medicine

    Latest Health Books

    A review of three of the latest health books to help you regain your health and energy.

    The first is “The adrenal reset diet” by Dr Alan Christianson and explains an easy way to reset you adrenals by cycling carbohydrates and protein. It is thoroughly tested and this is how Dr Christianson and his family live and eat on a normal basis. If you are suffering from a chronic disease and lack energy then this book will certainly be of interest to you. Please let me know how you get on.

    The second book is by Dr Frank Lipman “The New Health Rules” and I love the title of this one. Health information is changing rapidly, sugar is the bad guy, not all fats, how we need daily sunlight, how to prevent Alzheimer’s and much more information that helps us realise the important facts despite all the contradictory information that we are given.

    The third book is “The Autoimmune Solution” by Dr Amy Myers. Out as Kindle version on 27th January 2015 and hardback 26th February 2015 it can be pre-ordered now. Dr. Myers, who had an autoimmune disease herself, ran The Autoimmune Seminar last year and interviewed many of the foremost doctors and nutritionists spreading the knowledge around the world. For anyone that missed the seminar or found themselves unable to take in all the information, this book will be the perfect reference guide to help you take control of your condition or prevent it developing.