Health/ Nutritional Medicine/ Wheat and Dairy Intolerance

So is Gluten intolerance a FAD?

Gluten Intolerance

The Facts about Gluten 

  • We know because of tests carried out on bloods taken over 60 years ago that there is an increase in Celiac Disease of 400% and that it now affects 1 in 133 people in the USA. 95% are thought to be undiagnosed or not diagnosed until the disease is advanced.
  • China had no Celiac Disease and so it was assumed it was a genetic problem but as they have introduced more wheat into their diet they are developing Celiac Disease.
  • Gluten causes inflammation and damage to the lining of the small intestine. Nobody can digest gluten but some people tolerate it more than others.
  • According to research by scientist Stephanie Seneff gluten becomes much more allergenic when sprayed with herbicide, Glyphosate – it binds to the gluten and alters its structure. This may explain why scientists have been unable to come up with a protein or immune marker unique to gluten when a toxin is also involved.
  • In the Western World we are now eating gluten far more than at any time in the past. Cereals, sandwiches, pasta, biscuits, cake, plus all the hidden sources we can be consuming it all day long.
  • There is an epidemic of Autoimmune disease at present with over 50 million sufferers and more than 140 different conditions categorised as Autoimmune so far, which is more than Cancer and Heart disease account for in total. In the latest research people with 34 different Autoimmune diseases were all tested positive for a leaky gut – the main trigger for which is gluten.
  • A large number of patients who have a negative intestinal biopsy still have symptoms and improve when they eliminate gluten. Genetic testing is unreliable in about 35-50% of cases for either Gluten intolerance or Celiac Disease. Blood tests for antibodies have similar amounts of false negative results and you have to have been eating gluten prior to the test.
  • At the 2011 Oslo International Celiac Symposium they agreed that there was proof that there was non-Celiac gluten sensitivity but decided to consider both under the term “Gluten Related Disorders” and since that time, research into non-Celiac gluten sensitivity has increased dramatically by about 43 papers to every 1 on Celiac.
  • In 2006 The Journal for Attention Disorders published a paper on 132 children with ADHD where they put them on a gluten free diet and they reported improvement in all 12 markers for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

So what is the best approach? The tests are invasive and unreliable at present so if you think you have problems with gluten sensitivity try going totally gluten free for 3-6 months. Most people who have had distressing symptoms will notice a dramatic improvement. Follow the diet and guidelines for supplements in other posts on Millenniumhealth.

  1. Gluten free diet for at least 3 months and try dairy or lactose free at the same time as the end of the villi in the intestines get damaged and no longer produce lactase therefore often bloating, gas and diarrhoea can also be caused by dairy foods.
  2. Take good probiotic supplements.
  3. Cut down on sugar and alcohol.
  4.  Take gut healing amino acid L- Glutamine and Silicogel that will ease gut inflammation symptoms.
  5. Take a good multi-vitamin and mineral supplement that is gluten and dairy free. If your digestive tract is inflamed you probably have not been getting all the nutrients you need from your food and you need them all to heal.

If you do not see a huge improvement in your health then try re-introducing these foods in moderation and only one at a time to monitor the effects. Consult a medical practitioner if you still have problems and get a food allergy blood test done as there may be additional sensitivities that need to be addressed.

Take a look at this YouTube video on Gluten sensitivity.

If you would like more information on Gluten Sensitivity or Celiac disease visit the Glutenology site and get the free video presentation.

Statistics taken from The Autoimmune Summit sessions from Dr. Alessio Fasano and Dr. Tom O’Bryan.

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